Girl in a jacket South Africa

Rehabilitation and Medical Centers

Houghton House Rehabilitation Centre

Specialities:

Drug and alcohol clinical detox and tailor-made rehabilitation programmes to suit individual needs administered in state-of-the-art facilities.

Contact/ Address:

432 York Ave Ferndale Randburg 2194 South Africa Tel: +27 11 787 9142 Email: info@houghtonhouse.co.za website: http://www.houghtonhouse.co.za

Description:

The Houghton House group has been operating since 1995, treating those suffering from alcoholism, drug dependency and other addiction problems. The anti-addiction programmes are divided into primary, secondary and tertiary care and range from 28-day programmes to communal living and re-integration programmes lasting a number of weeks.


Stabilis Treatment Centre (previously known as Staanvas Centre)

Specialities:

Detoxification and drug rehabilitation in a Christian religious context.

Contact/Address:

1229 Haarhoff Street-East Morégloed Pretoria 0186 South Africa Tel: (012) 333 7702Email: pro@stabilistc.co.za Website: staanvas.co.za

Description: Live-in rehabilitation programmes overseen by professional staff. Thirty five-day programmes give the patient access to a psychiatrist, medical doctor, occupational therapist, Christian minister, dietician and psychologist plus the 24-hour support of qualified nursing staff. Aftercare continues for 11 months after the rehab programme has ceased, during which time patients receive personal counselling one-to-one and over the phone.


Oasis Counselling Centre

Specialities:

Treatment of all forms of addiction including drugs, alcohol, gambling, sex or self harm. Long-term residential care is the focus and the psychological approach is based on the ‘12 Step’ model.

Contact/Address:

119 Longships Drive Plettenberg Bay 6600 South Africa Tel: +27 44 533 1752Email: info@oasiscentre.co.za Website: www.oasiscentre.co.za

Description:

Residential drug rehabilitation in the tranquil environment of South Africa’s Plettenberg Bay. Addiction recovery is based on intensive counselling and residential groups are kept small (maximum of 12) to ensure personal and relevant one-on-one support throughout the programme. Healthy diet, exercise and appreciation of the natural environment are all incorporated into the treatment plan.

National Narcotics Control Authorities

Name:

Central Drug Authority (CDA) – Department of Social Development.

Contact/Address:

Central Drug Authority
Department of Social Development
134 Pretorius Street
HSRC Building
Pretoria

Email: contact form available on the website
Website: www.dsd.goz.za/cda/index.php

The Central Drug Authority is a sub-department of the South African government Department of Social Development. It is charged with upholding the terms of the Prevention of Substance Dependency Act of 1992 which are to implement the National Drug Master Plan (NDMP), to advise government ministers on all matters related to the drug abuse and to plan, co-ordinate and publicise measures for drug abuse prevention and the best way to treat those who are addicted to drugs.

The Prevention and Treatment of Drug Dependency Act informs the CDA’s actions. In accordance with the Act, the CDA is require to report to the South African parliament once a year to inform the house on action taken. The NDMP covers five year periods, the first from 2000-2004, and then again in 2006-2011. The CDA is made up of 12 recognised drug abuse experts, appointed by the Minister of Social Development and who serve for five years. In addition to the CDA, Provincial Forums concerned with substance abuse exist in each of the provinces in the country and they are responsible for establishing Local Drug Action Committees (LDACs) in individual municipalities. Each LDAC is comprised of local stakeholders who are associated with the fight against drugs.

National Narcotics Control Strategies and Security Plans

Name:

South Africa Country Profile on Drugs and Crime

Type:

Security

Published Authority:

UNODC

Date:

1 October 2002

Internet link:

www.unodc.org/pdf/southafrica/country_profile_southafrica.pdf

Publisher website:

www.unodc.org

Name:

Substance use and abuse in South Africa.

Type:

Preventative

Published Authority:

Parliamentary Monitoring Group

Date:

6 September 2011

Internet link:

www.pmg.org.za/report/20110907-presentation-central-drug-authority

Publishers website:

www.pmg.org.za

Name:

International Narcotics Control Bureau – Analysis of the world situation (Africa)

Type:

Preventative

Published Authority:

INCB

Date:

2011

Internet link:

www.incb.org/pdf/annual-report/2011/English/AR_2011_E_Chapter_III_Africa.pdf

Publishers website:

www.incb.org

Narcotics control regulations and laws

Name:

Prevention of Substance Dependency Act 1992

Published Authority:

Central Drug Authority – Government of South Africa

Date:

3 March 1992

Internet link:

www.dsd.gov.za/cda/index

Publisher Website:

www.dsd.gov.za/cda


Name:

Drugs and Drug Trafficking Act 1992

Published Authority:

Central Drug Authority – Government of South Africa

Date:

1992

Internet Link:

www.dsd.gov.za/cda/index

Publisher Website:

www.dsd.gov.za/cda


Name:

Prevention and Treatment of Drug Dependency Act 1992

Published Authority:

Central Drug Authority – Government of South Africa

Date:

1992

Internet Link:

www.dsd.gov.za/cda/index

Publisher Website:

www.dsd.gov.za/cda

Facts and stats

  • According to a survey carried out by the Central Drug Authority of South Africa between June 2010 and March 2011, the use of illegal drugs in the country was twice the global average.
  • In 2011South Africa was in the top 10 nations when it came to alcohol consumption.
  • In the 2011 survey on drug use, 65% of those surveyed said that they had a drug user residing with them in their home.
  • Most frequently abused drugs in South Africa are alcohol, cannabis, tobacco and glue.
  • Methamphetamine, known as Crystal Meth or ‘Tik’, is an increasingly prevalent drug used in the country, especially in urban centres. Its use has been connected with the rise in violent crime, especially amongst the young as it is known to remove inhibition and increase aggression.
  • According to research data in 2011 more than 37% of adults admitted to binge drinking on a regular basis, 10% of drivers were still intoxicated on Monday morning after a weekend of binge drinking and 7,000 deaths were recorded that were attributed to driving under the influence of alcohol.
  • Research also showed that women who had a drug dependency were 46% more likely to be a victims of physical abuse, incest and rape.
  • Prior to 2004, drug prevention was the responsibility of the South African Narcotics Bureau. Since its disbanding, drug related crime has rises by 87% nationally.
  • The number of South African citizens being treated for cocaine addiction rose from 1.5% in 1996 to 17.5% in 2008.
  • It is estimated that drug and alcohol abuse costs South Africa approximately R130billion a year.

Governmental / Non-governmental Associations

South African Alliance for the Prevention of Substance Abuse (SAAPSA)

Type:

Non-governmental

Contact/Address:

PO Box 13129
Vrna Valley
Midrand 1686
South Africa

Established in 1995, SAAPSA is engaged in the prevention of substance abuse throughout South Africa. It networks with various other organisations in the country in order to promote and implement its prevention agenda. The association is involved in the organisation of training workshops and seminars related to the abuse of drugs, and carries out field visits for the evaluation and monitoring of the extent of drug abuse in South Africa.

Substance Misuse: Advocacy, Research and Training of South Africa (SMART)

Type:

Non-governmental

Contact/Address:

SMART 21 Avignon Hillcrest Road Somerset West 7130South Africa
Tel: 021 852 6065

SMART works in the areas of education, prevention and training related to HIV/AIDS and substance and alcohol abuse. The overall objective of the association is to promote a greater understanding of the various issues surrounding the abuse of drugs, including the spread of HIV/AIDS from the sharing of needles between intravenous drug users.