Girl in a jacket Switzerland

Rehabilitation and Medical Centers

The Küsnacht Practice, Küsnacht

Specialities:

Treating addictions and a range of other psychological disorders, The Küsnacht Practice specialises in diet and biochemical therapies as well as behavioural ones to reduce the chance of relapse.

Contact/Address:

Untere Heslibachstrasse 41b
CH-8700 Küsnacht
Tel: +41 43 541 11 52

Website:/www.addictions-counsellor.com/Addiction-Treatment-Psychotherapy/about-us

Description: Set in pleasant surroundings, this facility focuses on balancing brain chemistry as well as providing expert psychiatric services in order to give drug addicts the best possible chance of recovery from their addiction.

Sala Capriasca, Tessin

Specialities:

Treatment for drug addiction with a strong emphasis on overall wellbeing including yoga, meditation, creativity and seclusion from the stress of everyday society.

Contact/Address:

Vincenzo Altepost
Via Santa Liberata
6954 Sala Capriasca
Ticino, Switzerland


Tel: 0041 91.943.49.74
Email: v.altepost@bluewin.ch
Website: www.adhikara.com/drug-addiction-therapy-rehabilitation-switzerland/index.html

Description:

Intended as an effective method of detoxing, this clinic uses traditional methods such as meditation to help addicts beat their addiction in a relaxing environment. As part of a small community, creativity and relaxation are encouraged to help addicts discover themselves and combat the effects of addiction.

National Narcotics Control Authorities

Name:

Swissmedic

Address/Contact:

Swiss Agency for Therapeutic Products
Narcotics Division
Hallerstrasse 7
3000 Bern 9
Switzerland

Tel: 41 31 322 04 89
Email: autorisation.narco@swissmedic.ch
Website: http://www.swissmedic.ch/index.html?lang=de

Like with many things, the Swiss take a slightly more pragmatic approach to drugs than do many other countries, and as such do not have a single agency responsible solely for the control of restricted drugs. Instead, those activities fall under the remit of Swissmedic, an organisation that controls the classification of all drugs, both legal and illegal. In conjunction with the Federal Department for the Interior and the Swiss police, Swissmedic sets out drug enforcement strategies, as well as regulating the market. Although some drugs are legal in Switzerland, albeit still controlled, others are just as illegal there as they are anywhere else.

Whilst the police are more likely to be involved in the apprehension of drug traffickers and users, narcotics in Switzerland are controlled, at least in an administrative capacity, by Swissmedic. The emphasis in Switzerland is generally on rehabilitation rather than criminalisation, however that does not preclude the need for robust strategies in dealing with drug-related crime.

National Narcotics Control Strategies and Security Plans

Name:

The Four Pillars Strategy / Fourfold Drug Policy

Type:

Preventive

Published Authority:

Federal Council

Date:

February 20, 1991

Internet link:

Publisher website:

www.admin.ch/br/index.html?lang=en

Narcotics control regulations and laws

Name:

Federal Act 1951

Published Authority:

Federal Council

Date:

October 3, 1951

Internet link:

www.admin.ch/ch/d/sr/8/812.121.de.pdf

Publisher website:

www.admin.ch/br/index.html?lang=en

Name:

Narcotics Control Ordinance

Published Authority:

Federal Council

Date:

May 25, 2011

Internet link:

www.admin.ch/ch/d/sr/8/812.121.1.de.pdf

Publisher website:

www.admin.ch/br/index.html?lang=en

Facts and stats

  • Switzerland is renowned for being one of the most democratic countries in the world, making extensive use of referendums. The Federal Act 1951, which sets out Switzerland’s approach to drug enforcement, was last ratified in 2008 with a majority of 68%.

  • In the early 20th Century, Switzerland’s drug legislation was largely in line with that of other European countries. However, in the 1950s and 1960s the Swiss decided to shift their emphasis from suppression to rehabilitation, reducing the harm that drug users inflict on themselves and others.

  • Whilst the statistics suggest a dramatic decrease in the number of drug addicts, as well as drug-related fatalities, this approach is not popular with everyone. It is also thought to be unlikely to have the same effect in other countries, although the UK and Holland have begun to offer some illegal drugs by prescription as a means of mitigating the effects of addiction.

  • Heroin is available on prescription in Switzerland.

  • Statistics pertaining to the incidences of drug use in Switzerland are difficult to locate, as the decriminalisation of certain drugs means that there are no criminal arrests to record. However, the decreasing number of addicts receiving treatment suggests that overall drug use has been reduced.

  • Between 1991 and 2004, the number of drug-related deaths in Switzerland dropped by 50%. Drug-related HIV infection also dropped significantly over this time.

  • The “Four Pillars Strategy”, whilst having already been implemented for many years, was only enshrined in Swiss Federal law in 2008.

Governmental / Non-governmental Associations

No information available